How to Write a Nanny Resume: 7 Tips

March 15th, 2021
by A Nanny Match

How to Write a Nanny Resume: 7 Tips

When applying for any job, it's essential to make a great first impression with a well-formatted resume that highlights your relevant experience.

We review dozens of resumes a day. Here are our top 7 tips on how to present a resume that will get noticed by parents and agencies alike. 

How to Write a Nanny Resume: 7 Tips

1. Format

Keep it neat. Your resume should be easy to read. Use resume templates you can find online, such as this free one professional nanny resume template provided by Indeed.com. Begin with your most recent position and work backward. 

2. List Relevant Experience 

Your nanny resume should be concise, approximately 1-2 pages in length, and should include your relevant experience working with children. 

Make sure to include the children’s ages when you started with the family, the location, dates of employment, and job responsibilities. If there were large gaps between your nanny jobs that are not relevant, list those jobs titles and dates, sans the list of duties.

3. Tailor Your Resume to Jobs

If you apply to a position that requires a combination of domestic household experience and have those experiences such as Nanny, Newborn Care Specialist (NCS), House Manager, Housekeeping, or Tutor, tailor your generic nanny resume to reflect your experience for that particular role. 

Parents and recruiters look for specific experience in any role, and they only move forward with the candidates who have it. 

In competitive areas like NYC, it's common to receive hundreds of applicants for each position

4. Necessary Credentials

If you are a professional nanny, you've probably had training in Infant CPR and Frist Aid. Make sure to get recertified every few years.

If you apply for nanny positions with infants and toddlers and do not have CPR/Frist Aid training, get certified. In-person training is a better option, but due to the covid-19 pandemic, online will suffice. There are plenty of resources for online courses, such as American Red Cross CPR and First Aid. It only takes a few hours and is usually a requirement for the job. 

Look up cost-friendly ways to earn other childcare-related certifications. Acquiring more credentials can not only help you get a job but ask for a higher salary.

The International Nanny Association, for example, offers a Nanny Credential Exam that tests a candidate’s working knowledge of children's developmental needs and safety precautions. It's a quick way to earn brownie points on your resume. 

5. Explain yourself

Including a short statement about your childcare philosophies can catch the eye of parents and recruiters.

Indicating the reason for parting ways with each family, especially short-term roles, will go a long way.

Include your hobbies and interests, language skills, coursework, and even your personality traits.

6. Profile Picture.

At the top of your resume, include a clear, professional image of yourself in work-appropriate clothing. 

In today’s digital age, applications without images often get overlooked. If you need an updated and inexpensive professional photo, learn how to take your own professional headshots at home. 

7. A Nanny Portfolio.

These days especially, a request to meet in-person is a strong indication you may get the job. Bringing a nanny portfolio with you is typically an impressive move. You can find examples on sites like Pinterest by doing a simple search for nanny portfolio templates

Include your resume, copies of your certifications, reference letters. Other items to include are; a sample schedule, a list of your favorite children’s books, children’s meal plan examples, arts and crafts activities, etc.

We hope this information helps you in your search!

Be sure to check out A Nanny Match’s job board for up-to-date available FT, PT, live-in, and live-out nanny positions. We have a rigorous screening process, but we help you in more ways than just getting a job if you’re selected. Good luck, and we wish you the best!